27 Jun 2013

Double Helix Water Autism Quackery

There's a new quackery promoter in town and he sent me the following email a few days ago. My thoughts are in red:

"Dear Sharon, 
I have just been reading your blog I don't think so and wanted to introduce you to a new approach to working with Autism. Rather than send you a long email.
Don't leave me hanging, rather than send a long email you'll...?

I just wanted to say that I am new to the Autism community here in the UK allow me to represent the autism community in the UK and Ireland and say hello and welcome as I am working to try and connect with parents of Autistic children but not autistic adults? with a view to subsidising a trail oh here it comes of a water product that is having very positive outcomes with Autistic children. Wowee positive outcomes! That sounds like a good if rather vague achievement. And you're subsidising a trial? Does that mean people are actually being asked to pay to take part in a research project? Ethics fail.
I have attached a couple of pdf's for you to look at and look forward to hearing back from you when you have a moment.
 
Best Regards,
Jeremy Jones
Double Helix Water (UK) Limited
Company Number 8482978
Distributors of Double Helix Water for United Kingdom and Ireland"
(Double Helix Water-it's like DNA and water combined and doesn't that sound just awesome!)
Jeremy's email included a link to a science-y video all about the mysteries of water. Also attached was a slick marketing PDF which is what really piqued my ire. I can't find a link (will forward PDF to anyone interested) I uploaded it to Google Drive and here's the opening page:
 
Autism- ripping jeans and upsetting little kids since 1943
 
 
They're selling hope, the most marketable of all products. But they need first of all to frighten potential customers who, if they knew that autism is part of the naturally occurring diversity of human experience, wouldn't be hoodwinked by their pitch.
 
This document which I'm calling A New Hope goes on to proclaim that we're in the midst of a Global Epidemic, autism is a "medical and social issue that we can no longer afford to ignore. It has to be dealt with, and real solutions need to be
found." 
 
This is followed up with an unreferenced "study" concluding that biomedical treatments are 81% safer and 60% more effective at "producing improvement" than drug treatments for autism, all based on parent consultations and the Autism Research Institute. 
 
So much fail. To start:
  1. who was "improved" and how?
  2. drugs don't count as "biomedical treatments"?!
  3. how was relative safety defined and measured
  4. parental opinion is hardly objective.
  5. the Autism Research Institute is a key player in the axis of autism-vaccine nonsense, it is a disreputable organisation promoting pseudo-scientific and potentially dangerous treatments for autism.
  6. what exactly are the drug treatments referred to?
On to page 11 and more misinformation:
"Genetics Does Not Explain Autism
A Stanford University study of twins published last year found that genetics accounts for just 38 percent of the risk."
That's not what the study found- its authors say that the role of environmental factors has been underestimated. However an alternative analysis of their data concludes that it supports the findings of all previous twin studies and provides further evidence of the heritability of autism.

There is certainly no evidence for A New Hope's next claim, "The Majority Of Autism Is Caused By Environmental Factors."
After the usual autism-snake-oil pitch about gastrointestinal disorders and chemicals and toxins (oh my!) we're shown the solution- our saviour is so highly qualified the page is crammed with accolades:

Our hero

And this genius discovered something remarkable- stable water clusters. I think he means ice crystals. But anyway these, A New Hope claims, "have a remarkable effect on the Human Immune system."

What is it with quacks and non-standard word capitalisation?

On page 21 we learn that they use "Completely Safe thermal imaging" not harmful x-rays to examine the patient. But why would anyone even suggest using x-rays to discover anything about autism?!

Pink bad green good

So the magic water is administered and as the "startling" thermal image above of an autistic 7 year old shows, after only 20 minutes the child's temperature has dropped. Perhaps the heating was broken.

A New Hope ends with a pair of testimonials about how the magic water made a little boy and autistic teens smarter and healthier.

OK I'm convinced- where can I sign up to get the boy known as Duncan a supply of water clusters to make him more green and less autistic? Thankfully there's a FAQ on the website telling all. There's also the small detail of cost, they ask "participants to contribute $800 for this research project for three months". And they have the cheek to ask people to fork out that kind of money for water with a disclaimer that comprehensively states that participants can and should expect nothing for their money: "Nothing in this material is presented here as an effort to offer or render medical advice or opinions or otherwise engage in any type of medical practice."

This is a ridiculous con but some parents of autistic children will fall for it. It disgusts me that the people behind these companies are so lacking in standards, morals and ethics that they prey on people at a vulnerable point in their lives.

Mike directed me to a site dedicated to water quackery which other than homoeopathy, was to me, an undiscovered ocean of woo. Dr Lo and his Double Helix water gets a special mention.

And Allan sent me a link to an inadvertently funny video about emotional water- with ice crystal formation supposedly dependant on exposure to words.

What would happen if the water was exposed to these words?



 

6 comments:

Sharon McDaid said...

Jeremy from Double Helix water didn't like this post and replied to my email with, "Thanks for such open mindedness its nice to know that there are people willing to entertain that the earth is no-longer flat. When I have some positive results from UK users remind me not to waste your time with them."

What a fine representative of his company he is!

Zeno said...

His email clearly seems to be a marketing communication and is therefore subject to the Advertising Standards Authority's CAP Code. I suspect it doesn't comply...

When an advertiser makes a claim, he must provide the ASA with good evidence to substantiate that claim if challenged by the ASA. I wonder if he holds that good evidence? I somehow doubt it...

Sharon McDaid said...

Good point Zeno. I've uploaded the PDF he sent to Google drive so others can see it. Might be worth sending it to the ASA.

simplegiftsgalleries said...

the Autism Research Institute is a key player in the axis of autism-vaccine nonsense, it is a disreputable organisation promoting pseudo-scientific and potentially dangerous treatments for autism.

I don't believe in woo. I think this is...well, I'm not going to waste my time looking it up (anymore, hey ;)) BUT, I hate to see the Autism Research Institute mentioned without the (long dead) leader of it, Dr. Bernard Rimland, woo defender in the end...not being recognized for doing his part to abolish the refrigerator mother theory which was ~the~reason for autism in most medical people's minds, and was THE reason for autism in the minds of psychiatry. Seems even science can be full of stuff sometimes. The refrigerator mother was also just "sciency" enough to be regarded as truth.

Truth is the cry of all, but the game of the few.

Anonymous said...

Your going to send it to the ASA? The same people who supress info and make sure babies continue to be labotomized with poisonous vaccines. Woman you sooo deserve what you get by being stuck with a special needs child.

Sharon McDaid said...

Dear anonymous commenter (who left a series of incoherent rants on various posts), go hang yer bollocks.